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July 02, 2008

Are You A 'Tuned In' Solo Practitioner?

I've recently completed the pre-released version of "Tuned-In" written by Craig Stull, Phil Myers and David Meerman Scott and I can only say if you have any desire to understand how to tap into opportunities that present themselves in your legal practices, then BUY THIS BOOK.  (Disclosure - the only benefit I get from discussing this book is helping you!)

I'll take the blurb right off the back because I can't say it any better:

Tuned In argues that the key to business success lies in understanding and connecting with what consumers and markets want most.  Being tuned in to the needs of buyers, whether those needs are expressed outwardly or not, is the ultimate secret to creating and marketing products and services that people want to buy.  For anyone who markets a product, service, or ideas in any business, industry, or organization. Tuned In delivers a simple six-step process for discovering real and deep insights into any market: finding unsolved problemsFront Cover, understanding buyer personals, quantifying impact, creating breakthrough experiences, articulating powerful ideas, and establishing sustainable connections.

Tuned In shows readers how to stop guessing what consumers need and stop wasting time and money building, marketing, and selling solutions that the market doesn't value.  This insightful book shows readers how to connect with their market in order to create products and services that truly resonate with people.

How does this relate to you, the solo practitioner?  In every way imaginable.  Your services are a product and you are creating a brand in how you deliver your product to the client via your marketing message and client interaction.  Your core competencies are your legal skills.  Your distinctive competencies are your brand, what differentiates you from your colleagues with the same core competencies.  These distinctive competencies are a blending of your ability to listen to what the client really needs, who you are and what you ultimately choose to deliver and this is impacted by your own wants, needs and desires.

The most important differentiation you can make is in creating a total client experience that resonates with the client.

Here's the chapter list:

1. Why Didn't We Think of That?
2. Tuned Out... and Just Guessing
3. Get Tuned In
4. Step 1: Find Unresolved Problems
5. Step 2: Understand Buyer Personas
6. Step 3: Quantify the Impact
7. Step 4: Create Breakthrough Experiences
8. Step 5: Articulate Powerful Ideas
9. Step 6: Establish Authentic Connections
10. Cultivate a Tuned In Culture
11. Unleash Your Resonator       

This book is filled with real life examples of why some businesses succeed and others do not based upon the principles discussed in the book and the way the book is written brings the theories to life and makes them eminently relatable.  And Tuned In has now become a  'must read' for my clients.

I discuss these concepts in further detail in issue #14 in the Solo Practice University E-zine.  If you haven't signed up already you can do so in the widget to the right. ---------------->

Oh, and one of my favorite principles of Tuned In thinking.....when your're thinking about products or services to market to your clients, always remember, "you're opinion may be great, but it's completely irrelevant."  What matters is what the client thinks and what the client wants.

(And, by the way, the book mentions Grant Griffiths as a Tuned In Lawyer.  Congratulations, Grant!)

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Comments

David Meerman Scott

Hi Susan,

Thanks for writing about Tuned In. We appreciate it. We're constantly amazed at how well the ideas in the book work with small business and solo-practitioners. When everyone else is doing the same old thing, it is the smart entrepreneur that succeeds.

Best, David

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